ackr

dat-soldier:

officialunitedstates:

I want to be the first person on the moon to shoot a sniper rifle at earth and hit a wasp nest.  my whole life so far is leading up to that moment

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tell me which person drew this please.

natecosboom:

FLASH GORDON ANNUAL by BEN ACKER, BEN BLACKER, CHRIS ELIOPOULOS, JEFF PARKER and ME. (and more!) Cover by MARC LAMING & JORDAN BOYD!
SEPTEMBER!!!!!!!!!!

natecosboom:

FLASH GORDON ANNUAL by BEN ACKER, BEN BLACKER, CHRIS ELIOPOULOS, JEFF PARKER and ME. (and more!) Cover by MARC LAMING & JORDAN BOYD!

SEPTEMBER!!!!!!!!!!

witsradio:

mikeeaglestinks, paulftompkins, Peter Sagal, John Moe, Janie Haddad Tompkins and Janey Winterbauer are all practicing southern accents.

They are doing this because of me!

jslo21:

Dick Cavett moonwalking @ Thrilling Adventure Hour - Town Hall - NYC - May 10th, 2014. I believe all of the Work Juice Players are going to like this video! Enjoy!

not a workjuice player, but I enjoy this video.

hodgman:

I don’t know if @pftompkins will wear this king hat at the THRILLING ADVENTURE HOUR in Manhattan tomorrow night, but you should come see it anyway. http://bit.ly/thrillingmanhattan

sometime we should have a king-off between Paul and Mr. Hodgman.

hodgman:

I don’t know if @pftompkins will wear this king hat at the THRILLING ADVENTURE HOUR in Manhattan tomorrow night, but you should come see it anyway. http://bit.ly/thrillingmanhattan

sometime we should have a king-off between Paul and Mr. Hodgman.

singularstarbird:

So I’ve been wanting to do more character design, and also been listening to lots of The Thrilling Adventure Hour; these two things ended up dovetailing quite nicely. Here we have my concepts for Sparks Nevada (Marshal on Mars), Croach the Tracker, and The Red Plains Rider. 

Stray commentary: My Croach design used the ‘official’ TAH design sort of as a jumping-off point (blue & bald, with antenna and big black eyes), but I sort of wanted to take it in my own direction from there. As for the two human designs, I didn’t want either of them to look generically white, both because there are more than enough white heroes out there already (especially in Westerns), but also because it’s the future and I imagine humanity’s a lot more blended. I also wanted to have some element of Earth colors, green and blue, to contrast with the reddish Martian palette, hence my choice of eye colors.

I’d like to do more development for these designs, including wardrobe, but first I need to go look at a looooooot more Western clothing references.

Oh man! Love these!

jordiecolorsthings:

You may have heard of this thing - 

jordie colors things. she also awesomes things.

jordiecolorsthings:

You may have heard of this thing -

jordie colors things. she also awesomes things.

slaughterhouse90210:

My FAVORITE BOOKS OF 2013
2013 was a time of great binge-watching and great binge-reading. Here are some of the books I couldn’t put down this year. All are highly recommended.
THE ONE THAT DESTROYED ME (IN A GOOD WAY)
The Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner
Meet Reno, the most intriguing heroine of the year: she’s a motorcycle thrill seeker, an interloper in the downtown New York art scene of the mid-1970s,  part-time model, a naive American who gets embroiled in radical Italian politics. She also has terrible taste in men. The Flamethrowers weaves together these interconnecting threads of Reno’s life, the excitement and glamour, but also Reno’s vulnerability, her abject unworldliness. Page by page, sentence by sentence, word by word, the best book of 2013.
TWO SHORT STORY COLLECTIONS YOU SHOULDN’T MISS
With all respect to George Saunders, Tenth of December doesn’t need a plug from me. Here are two collections from 2013 that didn’t get as much love as they should have. Let’s change that.
Spectacle by Susan Steinberg
I’m gonna use the word “experimental” now. Shhh. Don’t be scared. Trust that I’m using the word to describe a style of writing that feels exciting and new and different, not pretentious or unnecessarily complicated. The linked stories in Spectacle feel like they’re breaking new ground even as they zero in on universal emotions. 
Bobcat by Rebecca Lee
I would like to live inside the title story in this collection, in which a dinner party gets all kinds of awkward. All of the stories in Bobcat contain worlds that feel perfectly self-contained and satisfying, and yet each and every one could be expanded into a novel that I would hungrily read.
MOST ANTI-YOLO NOVEL
Life After Life by Kate Atkinson
Life After Life explores the biggest of Big Questions: What would you do if you could live your life over and over again until you get it right? What does “right” even mean? Does it mean avoiding heartache, defying death, meeting a soulmate, having a family? Maybe not! Probably not! It takes a writer of great vision and discipline to create a story that has so many disparate threads, but feels so compact and elegant. Get through the first 50 pages and you’ll be hooked—I promise.
MOST LITERARY TAKE ON DATING JERKS, BROOKLYN-STYLE
The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P. by Adelle Waldman
AKA The One That Hits Too Close To Home. Adelle Waldman’s title character is a nice, smart, sensitive writer-type who happens to have no emotional intelligence whatsoever. What happens when the kinda-nerdy guy your parents would positively adore turns out to be kinda a dick? The fact that Waldman can make Nate P.’s personal life both so relatable and so deplorable is a testament to her critical eye.
MOST IMMERSIVE
Necessary Errors by Caleb Crain
My resolution for 2013 was to savor more of what I read, rather than racing through in a panic to get to the next one. Necessary Errors was a novel that forced me to take it slow—to get caught up in all of the wonderfully imagined details of Caleb Crain’s debut about a recent college grad  who travels to Prague in 1990, just as Czechoslovakia bid adieu to socialism. Hard not to see parallels between the nation’s attempt to find itself and a young man’s attempt to find himself, but the novel is so much bigger—world-expanding—than that.
MOST SUSPENSEFUL
At Night We Walk in Circles by Daniel Alarcon
From the very first pages of At Night We Walk in Circles, we know that something terrible is going to happen. We learn about a young, ambitious actor who tours through a nameless Latin American country with an experimental theater group, and we know that he meets some sort of tragic end. Despite the outcome, it’s a joy to take the journey with him, to ponder what it means to be a performer and what kinds of roles we play even when we aren’t on stage.
THE LITERARY THRILLER YOU SHOULD BE TALKING ABOUT
Cartwheel by Jennifer Dubois
I argued that Cartwheel should be the new Gone Girl (I even used GIFs!) and I stand by it—if you’re looking for a totally addictive and thought-provoking thriller that’s both masterfully written and fun to read, look no further. 
MOST CATHARTIC
The Woman Upstairs by Claire Messud
Read the first few pages of The Woman Upstairs and revel in the anger of Claire Messud’s protagonist, an elementary school teacher in her late 30s who is still waiting for her life to begin. Love her or think she’s lacking in likability, the woman upstairs vents a level of frustration with daily life with which I couldn’t help but sympathize, even as she grapples with the distinction between how much of life is real, as opposed to the stories we tell ourselves. 
BEST ATMOSPHERE
The Facades by Eric Lundgren
Most of the time when I read a mystery, I don’t really care too much about descriptions of where it’s set—I just want a fast-paced plot to push the narrative along. The Facades is the exception, a novel in which a decrepit Midwestern city is as much a moody, complicated character as it is the setting. When a beloved opera singer goes missing, her hapless husband attempts to track her down through the crumbling streets of Trude, a city that feels bizarre and surreal and also more than a little familiar.
BOOK I WISH I’D READ WHEN I WAS 20
My Education by Susan Choi
OK, so the Literary Review’s Bad Sex Award of 2013 will be awarded within hours, and I happened to have fallen in love with one of the shortlist contestants. I am not ashamed. Don’t let the dubious nomination fool you—My Education is hot as hell 99% of the time. Susan Choi’s novel about the complicated love life of a graduate student details all the shit we have to learn about in life that doesn’t take place in a classroom or lecture hall. 
MOST EPIC 
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
AKA Harry Potter and the Priceless Work of Art
Note: If you haven’t yet read The Secret History, you should probably do that before you read The Goldfinch. But if you already have, then call in sick to work and prepare to get swept away in a narrative that more than one critic has called “Dickensian.” 
BEST ESSAYS
Meaty by Samantha Irby
Thanks to Meaty I was the deranged lady on the subway who couldn’t stop giggling. Samantha Irby, of Bitches Gotta Eat fame, just keeps on telling it like it is, essay by essay, rapid-fire blogger-style. A joyous mixture of bad language, bad behavior, and bad relationships.
MOST HORRIFYING (AND FUNNY!) NONFICTION
Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief by Lawrence Wright
I had to stop underlining the sentences in Going Clear that made me gasp in horror because I would’ve ended up underlining the whole book. Lawrence Wright’s clear-eyed, phenomenally researched takedown of Scientology is straight-up terrifying. And also undeniably funny. I made a list of some of the most astounding/awful/hilarious quotes from the book, presented by Wright with very little editorializing. The bat-shitness of the whole enterprise speaks for itself.

slaughterhouse90210:

My FAVORITE BOOKS OF 2013

2013 was a time of great binge-watching and great binge-reading. Here are some of the books I couldn’t put down this year. All are highly recommended.

THE ONE THAT DESTROYED ME (IN A GOOD WAY)

The Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner

Meet Reno, the most intriguing heroine of the year: she’s a motorcycle thrill seeker, an interloper in the downtown New York art scene of the mid-1970s,  part-time model, a naive American who gets embroiled in radical Italian politics. She also has terrible taste in men. The Flamethrowers weaves together these interconnecting threads of Reno’s life, the excitement and glamour, but also Reno’s vulnerability, her abject unworldliness. Page by page, sentence by sentence, word by word, the best book of 2013.

TWO SHORT STORY COLLECTIONS YOU SHOULDN’T MISS

With all respect to George Saunders, Tenth of December doesn’t need a plug from me. Here are two collections from 2013 that didn’t get as much love as they should have. Let’s change that.

Spectacle by Susan Steinberg

I’m gonna use the word “experimental” now. Shhh. Don’t be scared. Trust that I’m using the word to describe a style of writing that feels exciting and new and different, not pretentious or unnecessarily complicated. The linked stories in Spectacle feel like they’re breaking new ground even as they zero in on universal emotions.

Bobcat by Rebecca Lee

I would like to live inside the title story in this collection, in which a dinner party gets all kinds of awkward. All of the stories in Bobcat contain worlds that feel perfectly self-contained and satisfying, and yet each and every one could be expanded into a novel that I would hungrily read.

MOST ANTI-YOLO NOVEL

Life After Life by Kate Atkinson

Life After Life explores the biggest of Big Questions: What would you do if you could live your life over and over again until you get it right? What does “right” even mean? Does it mean avoiding heartache, defying death, meeting a soulmate, having a family? Maybe not! Probably not! It takes a writer of great vision and discipline to create a story that has so many disparate threads, but feels so compact and elegant. Get through the first 50 pages and you’ll be hooked—I promise.

MOST LITERARY TAKE ON DATING JERKS, BROOKLYN-STYLE

The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P. by Adelle Waldman

AKA The One That Hits Too Close To Home. Adelle Waldman’s title character is a nice, smart, sensitive writer-type who happens to have no emotional intelligence whatsoever. What happens when the kinda-nerdy guy your parents would positively adore turns out to be kinda a dick? The fact that Waldman can make Nate P.’s personal life both so relatable and so deplorable is a testament to her critical eye.

MOST IMMERSIVE

Necessary Errors by Caleb Crain

My resolution for 2013 was to savor more of what I read, rather than racing through in a panic to get to the next one. Necessary Errors was a novel that forced me to take it slow—to get caught up in all of the wonderfully imagined details of Caleb Crain’s debut about a recent college grad  who travels to Prague in 1990, just as Czechoslovakia bid adieu to socialism. Hard not to see parallels between the nation’s attempt to find itself and a young man’s attempt to find himself, but the novel is so much bigger—world-expanding—than that.

MOST SUSPENSEFUL

At Night We Walk in Circles by Daniel Alarcon

From the very first pages of At Night We Walk in Circles, we know that something terrible is going to happen. We learn about a young, ambitious actor who tours through a nameless Latin American country with an experimental theater group, and we know that he meets some sort of tragic end. Despite the outcome, it’s a joy to take the journey with him, to ponder what it means to be a performer and what kinds of roles we play even when we aren’t on stage.

THE LITERARY THRILLER YOU SHOULD BE TALKING ABOUT

Cartwheel by Jennifer Dubois

I argued that Cartwheel should be the new Gone Girl (I even used GIFs!) and I stand by it—if you’re looking for a totally addictive and thought-provoking thriller that’s both masterfully written and fun to read, look no further.

MOST CATHARTIC

The Woman Upstairs by Claire Messud

Read the first few pages of The Woman Upstairs and revel in the anger of Claire Messud’s protagonist, an elementary school teacher in her late 30s who is still waiting for her life to begin. Love her or think she’s lacking in likability, the woman upstairs vents a level of frustration with daily life with which I couldn’t help but sympathize, even as she grapples with the distinction between how much of life is real, as opposed to the stories we tell ourselves.

BEST ATMOSPHERE

The Facades by Eric Lundgren

Most of the time when I read a mystery, I don’t really care too much about descriptions of where it’s set—I just want a fast-paced plot to push the narrative along. The Facades is the exception, a novel in which a decrepit Midwestern city is as much a moody, complicated character as it is the setting. When a beloved opera singer goes missing, her hapless husband attempts to track her down through the crumbling streets of Trude, a city that feels bizarre and surreal and also more than a little familiar.

BOOK I WISH I’D READ WHEN I WAS 20

My Education by Susan Choi

OK, so the Literary Review’s Bad Sex Award of 2013 will be awarded within hours, and I happened to have fallen in love with one of the shortlist contestants. I am not ashamed. Don’t let the dubious nomination fool you—My Education is hot as hell 99% of the time. Susan Choi’s novel about the complicated love life of a graduate student details all the shit we have to learn about in life that doesn’t take place in a classroom or lecture hall.

MOST EPIC

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

AKA Harry Potter and the Priceless Work of Art

Note: If you haven’t yet read The Secret History, you should probably do that before you read The Goldfinch. But if you already have, then call in sick to work and prepare to get swept away in a narrative that more than one critic has called “Dickensian.”

BEST ESSAYS

Meaty by Samantha Irby

Thanks to Meaty I was the deranged lady on the subway who couldn’t stop giggling. Samantha Irby, of Bitches Gotta Eat fame, just keeps on telling it like it is, essay by essay, rapid-fire blogger-style. A joyous mixture of bad language, bad behavior, and bad relationships.

MOST HORRIFYING (AND FUNNY!) NONFICTION

Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief by Lawrence Wright

I had to stop underlining the sentences in Going Clear that made me gasp in horror because I would’ve ended up underlining the whole book. Lawrence Wright’s clear-eyed, phenomenally researched takedown of Scientology is straight-up terrifying. And also undeniably funny. I made a list of some of the most astounding/awful/hilarious quotes from the book, presented by Wright with very little editorializing. The bat-shitness of the whole enterprise speaks for itself.

arcaneimages:

Creature from the Black Lagoon 

arcaneimages:

Creature from the Black Lagoon